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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
that they can come and take culinary classes and get jobs in a restaurant industry, a number of computer science classes here will get you a job at twitter, zynga. >> officials here have until october 15th to submit an action plan aimed at turning around city college. in san francisco rob ross, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> california's community college system is getting a new leader. gab rice paris is named the next over state's 112 campus system. he'll replace jack who retired this month. paris previously led the reno community college district in sacramento area. make up the nation's largest public college system. >>> over at uc berkeley citizen union workers held a rally today in support of five campus who have been laid off. the building they were assigned to were being demolished. they were denied the opportunity to transfer to other open positions. the university tells ktvu it is work wg the custodians to help find them similar jobs but they need to apply to different departments like any other campus employee. >>> the national hockey league announced today it is canceling the entire preseaso
is a film called "looper," the science fiction film that just played toronto that i just got back from. it's a really wonderful film with joseph gordon-levitt and bruce willis. i really hope people take a chance on it, 'cause it's a lot of fun, a lot of great action, and a lot of great ideas, which we don't have in movies these days. > > i have to tell you, i am very much enjoying the movie trailer to "won't back down." > > it kind of looks like an oscar contender doesn't it? just the way it's got viola davis, maggie gyllenhaal- > > two good actresses. > > yeah, but, you know, fox is not, they didn't really put this movie in the film festivals, so they're just kind of quietly releasing it here at the end of september. it has the look and feel of an oscar contender, but i really don't hold a whole lot of hope out for it. > > so september just kind of a month ... > > something we can write off. there's going to be some better stuff next month we can talk about. > > we will see you next month. that's erik childress, he is vice-president of the chicago film critics' association, joins us every
robotic claw. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. sleep train's inveis ending soon. sale save 10%, 20%, even 35% on a huge selection of simmons and sealy clearance mattresses. get 2 years interest-free financing on tempur-pedic. even get free delivery! sleep train stacks the savings high to keep the prices low. but hurry, the inventory clearance sale is ending soon. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ 7:16 a.m. and take a look at the weather elsewhere. there's a twist so yesterday. it rips through a small town that was outside of st. louis. it brought strong winds that were strong enough to blo
sophisticated mathematics and the science behind meteorology. we used data from many sources - data coming from the national weather service, data coming from farms - to predict not just the weather, but how that weather impacts farms. > > lloyd, tell me, what exactly does this do? what does this information do for, say, the farmer? > > well, instead of getting a generic and fairly vague weather forecast, we can provide a detailed forecast of when and where it might rain tomorrow on the farm, and more importantly, how that would affect the operations. so when i talk to farmers, one of the things that they tell me is a big challenge, especially in the drought-stricken season, is irrigation. they want to be much more efficient at using water, and they want to schedule that ahead of time. that's dependent on where and when it will rain tomorrow - the temperature, the humidity. the idea is that we not only predict the weather, but we can predict the schedule of the irrigation, where and when the water would need to be applied. > > is this being rolled out now, being put into use? > > well, we've ac
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
a video service. >> today we're looking at science-fiction becoming tomorrow's reality itself driving a car. >> that bill to sign the goebbels driverless car as a law--kron 4 news points out the public and benefit from travel as cars and how they may see them in reality. >> governor brown surprised the media by pulling up to gogol's headquarters in one of gogol's of thomas carr is the drive itself. apparently he was impressed >> its the only way to go guys >> uses the latest gps technology to drive and have a great gatnavigate. the bill te governor signed into law today allows google to test their driverless cars on public roads. before now they were testing and parking lots private rows or in nevada, the only of the state in the country to allow an autonomous vehicles on the road. >> this step self driving a car is another step for in california pioneers in the future and not just leaving the country but the whole world. >> the most accidents are caused by human error. it does not have to be this way. these vehicles have the potential to avoid accidents. it really has the potential t
called those science fiction becoming tomorrow's reality. >> they're closer to becoming reality than you think. abc's jim avila has taken one for a test drive. >> reporter: you've seen this, cars that slam on the brakes before you hit a pole. but here's something you have never seen. the car of the future. making the driver totally unnecessary. no hands. google's working on one. and the federal government is sponsoring a field test in ann arbor, michigan. with cars that automatically swerve past accidents and alert you to oncoming hazards. now, this at general motors test track. i sat in the driver's seat when this car stayed in its lane. it stopped on its own when a car driving 30 miles an hour slower, pulled in front of us. >> we can see the day when cars avoid collisions. >> reporter: it's on a dream, since george jetson sat in his flying car. >> the vehicle can take complete control and take you to your destination in comfort and safety and security. >> reporter: this prototype used radar, cameras and gps to drive itself. feet off the pedals. can look away. don't do this at home. at
problem with things that are preventable in health care. areason's i got into this of the science of medical mistakes -- ever since i got into this area of science of medical mistakes, people have come up with all kinds of stories. people come up after conferences and it is almost as if somebody has a story of somebody they know or somebody they love. host: who is responsible? guest: i think there are no villains in this game. i think everybody is well intended. we have an opportunity for hospitals to increase the level of accountability by disclosing their patient outcomes. doctors' groups have come together and endorsed great ways to measure hospital quality. 2,000 track them at the patient level. do we think the public has a right to know about the quality of their hospitals? host: haven't we been tracking outcomes for 50 years? we just keep increasing the outcomes but it hasn't improved. guest: absolutely. there are all kinds of outcomes to attract. services grow and every hospital. a lot of people are falling through the cracks. we have great measures that doctors' groups i j
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> jennifer: that was mitt romney back in his now infamous florida fund-raiser in may hoping to add to his haul. he's now actually spending as much as he's taken in and a lot of his campaign cash comes from one guy. casino magonate sheldon adelson. you will remember sheldon adelson joined romney on his controversy-filled trip to israel this past summer. adelson has clear interest in israel. i owns an israeli newspaper. he's been a vocal advocate for a tougher american stance against iran on israel's behalf but now it looks like his motives for supporting romney could even be a little more selfish. many of you may know he's under a federal investigation into money laundering at his casino in las vegas and possible violation of bribery laws in china. some observers thought that perhaps he was hoping to shield himself from that investigation by supporting the right candidate. adelson seemed
, improving how we train teachers. now i want to hire another thousand math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it particularly for manufacturing. taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close loopholes that are giving incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to give breaks to those investing in the united states. on energy, we both agree we've got to boost american production. oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. now, all of this is possible. in order for us to do it we'll have to close our deficit. one of the things tonight we'll discuss is how do we deal with our tax code and make sure we're reducing spending in a r
how we hire teachers. not to hire new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree are corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing. taken it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that give incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states upon energy. governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible. now in order for us to do agree how to to close our deficit in one of the things we will discuss tonight is how do we do with our tax code and how do we make sur
. >> the original or the newer ones? >> the original. come on, i'm a science person. >> it's hard to get your mind around something that significant, though. it's really crazy. >> spectacular stuff. fortunately, we know you can get your mind around the forecast. >>> i was just outside sampling the air. it's going to be one of those days where your hair does the wonky thing. >> it's already doing it. >> and we've got a little breeze out there too. it's like a damp breeze blowing. not good for hair. as far as today goes, let's head outside. normally, we'd be showing you the sunrise, but now the sun is rising later, setting earlier. in fact, now through march 16th of next year we have less than 12 hours of daylight. boo. that's all i have to say about that. ellicott city, maryland, at 59 degrees. gaithersburg from montgomery county to howard county. reston, virginia, 58 degrees. fort washington, maryland, currently coming in at 63 degrees. temperatures are up from where we've been the last couple of mornings. again, a little breeze out there. some of you may feel just a little chilled. on storm team
promise as a boy, winning top prizes at science fairs three years in a row. he believed in the truth. like all of us, he hated hypocrisy. he believed in the party and the right for all of us to pursue happiness. he believed in the values that founded an independent united states. he believes and medicine, justice, and pain. like many teenagers, he was unsure what to do with his life. he knew he wanted to defend his country. he knew he wanted to learn about the world. he entered the u.s. military, and like his father, trained as an intelligence analyst. in late 2009, age 21, he was deployed to iraq. there, it is alleged, he sought u.s. military that did not often follow the rule of law and she sought u.s. military that did not often follow the rule of law. it is alleged it was there in baghdad in 2010 that he gave to wikileaks, gave to me, and alleged he gave to the world details that exposed the torture of iraqis, the murder of journalists, and the detailed records of over 120,000 selling killings in iraq and afghanistan -- 120,000 killings in iraq and afghanistan. and the diplomatic cable
to go. it is the way of the future. and with the science advancing as rapidly as it is, i think it makes good sense. >> unless you're going to replace the experts -- and that's what those guys are, experts -- with experts, then it's potentially a problem. >> d.c. police says the city has not hired enough officers and has stretched the force too thin. >>> this morning parks and service will announce the contractor picked to repair the earthquake damaged washington monument. the monument sustained serious structural damage in last year's 5.2 magnitude quake. the top of the obelisk has large cracks. the repairs are expected to cost $15 million. the monument won't reopen until sometime in 2014. look for the latest on "news 4 midday" at 11:00 and on our website, nbcwashington.com of. >>> a major casino and gaming company wants to buy a stake in the largest gaming center maryland live. penn national gaming, which also jones rosecroft race way in prince george's county wants to buy a stake in maryland live. penn national has been trying to defeat maryland's gaming bill, and their hollywood casi
with countries around the world to deepen ties of trade and investment, and science and technology, energy and development -- all efforts that can spark economic growth for all our people and stabilize democratic change. but such efforts depend on a spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect. no government or company, no school or ngo will be confident working in a country where its people are endangered. for partnerships to be effective our citizens must be secure and our efforts must be welcomed. a politics based only on anger -- one based on dividing the world between "us" and "them" -- not only sets back international cooperation, it ultimately undermines those who tolerate it. all of us have an interest in standing up to these forces. let us remember that muslims have suffered the most at the hands of extremism. on the same day our civilians were killed in benghazi, a turkish police officer was murdered in istanbul only days before his wedding. more than 10 yemenis were killed in a car bomb in sana'a. several afghan children were mourned by their parents just days after they were ki
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. my next guest has a long history on wall street and washington. in the '80s, robert hormats was secretary of affairs. he was vice chairman of goldman sachs. basically, he's a big shot. welcome, bob. great to have you on the program. >> always a pleasure. >> so much to talk about. where are you just back from? >> i was at the conference, the apec conference in the russian far east, which is booming with energy and a lot of other things. >> are they not getting impacted by europe? you have europe a complete mess, china slowing down. how worried are you about global growth? >> i am worried about global growth. i don't think it's a crisis. certainly many parts of europe are slowing down. china is slowing down, although it's still growing at a reasonable rate. certainly we're going to see a slow down. it's one that need not lead to a sharp downturn. it'll certainly slow growth around the world and will certainly adversely affect tr
science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel's prime minister warned again today that iran is well on its way to creating a nuclear weapon and said the world needs to act. benjamin netanyahu spoke at the united nations. as he has often before, netanyahu condemned iran and its nuclear program, and called on other leaders to do the same. >> at stake is not merely the future of my country. at stake is the future of the world. and nothing could imperil our common future more than the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. >> woodruff: the israeli prime minister said the hour is, quote, "getting late" to stop iran as it continues its nuclear work. >> i speak about it now because the iranian nuclear calendar doesn't take time out for anyone or for anything. i speak aut it now because when it com
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> there ar lot of things that are right in the world today. it is a friday. the refs are back at work in the nfl. and on this last day of the third quarter the dow and s&p ontrack for the best monthly gain since june. this is the fourth month in a row. the big boy this morning the k shields and mainstay investments subsidiaries of new york life celebrating a recent launch of the mainstay municipal opportunities fund. with the nasdaq, starbucks celebrating a third anniversary. the instant coffee and recent launch of its system for at home brewing which by all accounts is getting off to a good start. >> yes. a big leadership conference coming up at starbucks. i believe in howard schultz. came on our show. i like this product. i like the fact europe might be turning. mostly i like the fact that when he gave one of these big meetings in new orleans a couple years ago, to get united states jump-started, it worked. i think he's got a clear bet. i like starbucks. >> you mentioned the possibility of europe turning. t
, edwards life sciences bucking the trend up 1.6% today after jeffrey boosted its revenue estimates starting this quarter saying it's seen strength from the company's heart valve. also raising its price target by 10 bucks to 125. keep in mind the fda is expected any day to approve an expansion of sepina's use to high-risk surgical patients noted by wells fargo yesterday. seeing a spike in this stock, at 107, spot 22. >>> the nasdaq with sema. >> reporter: a lot of big movers in tech. research in motion the best performing stock on the nasdaq 100 after reporting earnings last night. of course all eyes on that blackberry 10 device slated for the first half of 2013. facebook another big mover up 7%. pete najarian saying the sheryl sandberg interview on monday could be a catalyst to the stock similar to what we saw after mark zuckerberg spoke at that tech crunch conference. qualcomm, ubs writing that the near concerns related to the shipments could hit a soft patch in the next quarter. >>> today's power player is the chief investment strategist with oppenheimer funds with $82 billion under manag
with the same science? >> well, i don't believe that, i believe what they are doing is reweighting the data. that would not establish a trend. the accurate polling which is no reason to go to the polls. go to the accurate one. rasmussen shows the race within a point or two in each of the states . by the way, the trend in rasmussen and in my own poling is that romney was doing foin in august and fell back because of the democratic convention and recovered at end of last week and now even . that is the reality. if the election were held today. romney would carry ohio, florida, nevada, virge virge and a shot at wisconsin where i am today. and would win over 300 electoral votes. the media is deliberately or inadvertantly and wrongly showing the race to be different. >> brian: new york times and washington post using that science having him trailing in all three . nationally everyone said it is a dead heat. dick, stick around. we have to talk to you more. coming up there is no doubt about it that the attack in libya was an act of terror, why does the president blame a movie. dick morris has an i
from the institute's medicine, the national academy of science. from a pediatrician, the chair, representing the best in science. as we've looked at -- we did an analysis earlier this week. most schools were serving within this calorie range in the past. the difference is more fruits and vegetables. more leafy greens. more orange vegetables and basically a much healthier meal. >> going to be a shock to the system in the near term and you've got to admire the clever videography of those kids, but at some point, if this is what schools are serving, you know, when, next year? two years? three years? people will automatically go for the healthy stuff? >> i think younger children are already making the adjustment. i think it's harder on high school kids. any parent will tell you even at home, it's a challenge often with teenagers to get them to eat the healthy foods. >> do you think the video was funny or did it hurt your feelings? >> i did. i saw it for the first time last night. >> no hard feelings. >> no hard feelings. we love kansas. >> thank you so much. under secretary for foo
. there are different flavors all come down to science. commercial tomatoes have been scientifically bred to be inexpensive, easy to ship and avail scrabble all year round. nothing wrong with that says this tomato researcher. >> it's an economical crop. part of the reason is the farmer wants maximum yield out of his field. so we have a lot to thank the industry for for developing these. and nobody at that point expected it would have anything to do with the flavor of the fruit when they are ripened. >> reporter: at her lab, powell discovered hybrid commercial tomatoes no longer carry one gene found in heir looms. without it they produce less sugar. in our instant test one off the shelf tomato had just half the sugar. >> 5.5. >> reporter: of the heir loom tomato. sue fwar is only one reason that heirlooms may taste better. >> it smells so good. >> reporter: where and how they are grown counts for a lot. >> tomatoes you get at the supermarket, they look perfect. this one doesn't look perfect. >> to me it looks perfect. >> reporter: these garden variety tomatoes are anything but average to t
, systematically underreported to science we now see a political reaction to the economic crisis of monumental proportions. tweedledum tweedledee, operations between two political parties, very much like republicans and democrats here. what was called the greek socialist party and they would alternate every few years and they would change the. this year, everything increased changed. after the crunched down on the greek people, making them pay for crisis that has nothing to do with those and then paid for bailing out the richest folks in greece, etc., the greek people did what no one thought they would. the majority of people did not vote for either of those two parties, trying to understand what it was like to vote for neither the republicans are the or the democrats. in the last two elections, democracy and socialist party together brought under 40% that can bind the vote. an explosive party is the party called the cerise a party. it is a far left-wing party that is against all oesterle programs and wants to solve greece's problems they want to take wealth away from the greek rich. they got
for inviting me. >> hong kong university of science and technology. very much appreciate your thoughts. let's give you a look at what's on the agenda in asia tomorrow. japan central bank begins its two-day policy meeting. the boj is likely to stand pat this time around but may signal more stimulus on the 30th of october. elsewhere, india posed september services pmi following strong numbers in august and cnbc will have an exclusive interview with malaysia's prime minister, so be sure to tune in for that. >>> back over this side of the world, business activity in the eurozone shows no sign of a rebound. the latest composite pmi figures for september fell to the low nest three years. france and spain saw a mild contraction as the country struggled with painful austerity measures. >>> meanwhile, growth in britain's sector services slowed in september. services pmi fell to 52.2 last month down from a reading of 53.7 in august. joining us now discuss is chris williamson, chief economist at market. good to have you onboard. i want to start out with the uk numbers because we've seen some move in t
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. melissa: emerging markets led global stocks to the fourth monthly gain in september that. is the longest streak since 2007. as we enter into the last quarter of the year are stocks where you should be stashing your cash? sandra smith taking a closer look a from the pits of the cme in today's trade. sandra? >> hey, melissa, that is question everyone is asking themselves not just down on the floor but investors. we have chris to answer that question. we're looking stocks off the lows of the session after ben bernanke, the fed chairman, defended qe3. you traders tell me one of the reasons why stocks have been doing so well is because of all the easing from the fed. do you expect this rally in the world stock market to continue the rest of the world? >> he think the world stock market will continue rally. europe is sit getting their footing. pmi predict shun, 14 months of a contradiction. i think only really safe play is gold. we had a great pullback last week. we're going to be over the 1800 lev
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is, business pro. yes, it is. go national. go like a pro. ♪ >> i am lori rothman with your fox business brief. wall street continues to trade off of session lows. things not as bad as some people feared. the dow is down 50 points. americans were driven to open their wallets more in august. personal spending rose 1.5%, marking the biggest jump since february. dollar general is back in the news. unveiling a discount ahead of the holiday shopping season. 10% off for purchases of $75 or more. more namebrand items are included. discount start saturday. mark their calendars. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ ashley: facebook shares getting a nice boost today. fa
on the road. governor from throat to google northern campus. he said today science fiction is tomorrow's reality. an update on a story brought to us we. sales design review board has approved amazon rain tower design for its new headquarter. huge panels of metal. it has been contested by residents. it was three-two. the biggest development model ever in downtown seattle. dennis: airlines are socking it to passengers with baggage fees. cheryl: let's take a look at today's winners and losers on the nasdaq. research in motion it is always a winner or a loser. we will be right back. ♪ ♪ cheryl: about one thousand people protested outside the united nations today as president mahmoud ahmadinejad made his last speech as president of iran. purport cheryl, this was a less fiery speech that many people may have expected from president mahmoud ahmadinejad of iran. nonetheless, he took aim at his usual target, israel and the united states. he once again accused the israelis of being "a fake ever met" as he put it. he blamed united states for most of the world's problems. he said "it was time
, who will win? who are you picking? the way we look at it is not positivistic social science. it is anthropological. it is geographical. it is historical. this person hated that person's visions of the military. the senior general in the pakistani military told me, you americans think of your army and how sergeant gonzales from los angeles and the corporal from chicago and the major from new jersey all come into the military. you are all put into the military and it is a uniform group and you mix the pieces. we see this part of the world, especially afghanistan, as needing a regimental area. in your attempt to define the end game with institutions you are comfortable with, you are missing the point. they see the america effort, a transformational vision of afghanistan, that transformation effort -- little girls go to school, making it into something, spending a huge amount of money. i would argue the pakistanis have a static notion. they have been this way for 1000they beat the brits and the russians. they will beat you. i am agreeing with you in coming to some sort of closur
spending, we need to do this at the same time and invest in infrastructure and math and science education, we need to do this together. that argument is not being made by politicians today. >> they're doing us all a disservice. >> yes. >> wish people would talk like you do. >> we back them up, we elect them, we elected in 2010 we sent a bunch of guys there for a reason and that's why we had the first debt ceiling issue. they weren't going to raise it another, they want spending increases stopped immediately but they were sent there for, what spawned the rise of that movement, what happened in the first two years of the owe bea ma presidency? >> well i understand the movement, there's no question there's a lot of sentiment out there for stop the world, i want to get off. >> i think these guys are arguing two plus two equals grain, they're not even coming up with a number. this does not compute. they're not speaking the same language. >> i understand the sentiment of the tea party. lot of folks are sincere and they're fed up but it's like the dog that caught the car. at some point you have
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> let's get straight to rick santelli with the governor of nebraska then. >> yes. rick heineman. 9.1% in illinois. 9.1% unemployment in new york. 10.6% unemployment in california. governor, could you tell the world what the unemployment rate is in nebraska. >> the unemployment rate in nebraska is 4%, the second lowest in america, because we balance our budgets. we don't spend money we don't have. we've lowered taxes. we've modernized our economic incentive programs and we want to continue to do that. >> governor, it sounds so easy when we go over it this way. so why is there such big debates in illinois, california, new york, to raise taxes to fix problems when there's so many states from north dakota, oklahoma, nebraska that are lowering taxes, maybe some getting rid of state income taxes or modifying sales tax and the benefits? tell us about the benefits. >> well, the benefits of lower taxes is greater job creation, more jobs for young people, more jobs for families. i
dwet into it, how do you judge the brand science. >> you look at the proportion of the earnings to the brand. put a number on how important is this brand to the economic power of the company. >> i'm saying now revealing it, why is coke number one and not apple? >> coca-cola, i mean, one thing about brands is that they are not just a measure of what's going on now. they are a view into the future as well. the thing about coca-cola that you can't deny, 100-year-plus history of consistently delivering great product and relevant brand to people. apple -- as far as apple is concerned, we know they're doing great right now, but there's concerns about what might happen in the near future with the loss of steve jobs. >> i understand why you're so focused on brands, because brands is what you do. you advertise companies. they pay you money to make their brand bigger. actually in a world in which we're connecting over the internet where i care if my coffee maker is purchasable on amazon rather than the brand of that coffee maker is what you do for a living becomes less relevant? >> i'd sa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

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